Current Trainings

 

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Fall 2022 Course List

All courses will be live virtual courses unless noted as an "in person training" next to the title of the course.  In person courses will be held at different locations in the community; please check workshop listing for the location address.

The Social Worker's Ethical Role in Gender Affirming Care

Date: Friday February 3, 2023

Time: 9:00AM-12:00PM

CE Hours: 3.0

Course Description:

In this presentation, we will review the principles associated with trauma-informed care, naming the organizational and systemic impacts of this approach. We will describe the goal of healing-centered care, as well as how both TIC and HCC impact the TNBI population specifically.
Documentation will be provided to address the current literature surrounding gatekeeping and letter-writing for the transgender, nonbinary, and intersex community. Discussion will highlight how to sift through the literature to determine if the source is credible or designed to delegitimize the TNBI community. Additionally, clinical content surrounding trauma-informed care, healing-centered care, gender minority stressors, and the impact of transphobia on mental health care will be grounded within current best practice and evidence-based care. Of note, not all evidence-based methods will be applicable as we are only including those studies that included TNBI people within their research process.
 

Course Objectives:​

As a result of attending this training, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the current barriers to affirmative mental health care experienced by the transgender, nonbinary, and intersex (TNBI) community;
  • Identify and describe three common pitfalls associated with gatekeeping within the mental health community;
  • Assess current practices to determine areas of improvement needed to provide gender affirming care with minimal gatekeeping; and
  • Develop a process for meeting with TNBI clients for advocacy-based letter writing to support access to gender affirming interventions.

Instructor(s): 

Kayti Protos  is a queer, white, cisgender woman. She is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) in Pennsylvania and Connecticut, with over 15 years of clinical experience working with and advocating on behalf of the 2SLGBTQQIA+ community. Kayti is a doctor of social work (DSW), completing her degree at Rutgers School of Social Work with a focus on the intersectional experience of transgender and nonbinary clients navigating eating disorder(s), identity-based trauma, and gender dysphoria. She received her master of social work from Tennessee State University and her bachelor’s degree in women’s & gender studies and communication studies from Vanderbilt University. Kayti is the founder of Rainbow Resiliency, a small private practice dedicated to helping queer and trans clients navigate a world that is all-too-frequently hostile to their communities, as well as helping 2SLGBTQQIA+ clients explore paths to recovery from eating disorder and trauma. Kayti is passionate about providing accessible and gender affirming care, anti-oppressive and anti-racist practice, and social justice advocacy. Additionally, Kayti is the co-author of A clinician’s guide to gender identity and body image: Practical support for working with transgender and nonbinary clients. She is an adjunct faculty member within the Graduate Counseling Psychology program at Holy Family University and the School of Social Work at Rutgers. She has recently become an Assistant Professor and founding Director of the MSW Program at Moravian University. Outside of the professional world, Kayti can be found engaging in the high fantasy world of Dungeons & Dragons as both a player and a game master. She is a certified "Geek Therapist". She dabbles in creative writing, enjoys organizing board game nights with her friends, and enjoys hanging out with her favorite felines, Aya and Saffi.

Wednesday Reim Ifrach REAT, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPC, NCC, CLAT, LCMHC, TPMH, LPCC (They/Them/Theirs) Wednesday is a trans/non-binary art therapist, fat activist and artist whose work focuses on body justice, intersectional social justice and eating disorder treatment equity access.They are the Director for Walden Behavioral Care’s Rainbow Road, the country’s first virtual Eating Disorder 2slgbtqia+ IOP & PHP, which is proud to announce having over 90% Queer Staffing (as of February 2022). They also co-own and operate Rainbow Recovery where they support people through the gender affirmation process, complex trauma recovery, eating disorder recovery and body image issues. Wednesday is committed to the mission that all bodies deserve recovery and that marginalized bodies need to be amplified in the eating disorder landscape to eradicate the stereotypes surrounding eating disorders and gender. To that end Wednesday had the honor to participate in the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Artful Practices for Well-being, presented at national and international conferences on the use of HAES, Intuitive Eating and Intersectional Social Justice in mental health care and teaches multicultural and diversity practice in Master’s Level Art Therapy programs. When Wednesday isn’t working they enjoy raising many animals including Pinball Wizard, their blind dog, watching all things Horror on repeat, obsessing over all things Elton John, and enjoying time with their partner.

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Psychosocial and Therapeutic Approaches to Psychosis: Overview of the Field

Date: Friday February 10, 2023

Time: 9:00AM-11:30 AM

CE Hours: 2.5

Course Description:

This training will introduce participants to contemporary, state of the science approaches to working with psychosis, with a primary focus on psychotherapeutic models, including cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis (CBTp), relating therapy for distressing voices, compassion focused therapy (CFTp) and experience-focused counseling (EFC).  An underlying goal is to familiarize participants with tools and strategies for working and engaging directly with clients' experiences of psychosis, including distressing voices and beliefs.

Course Objectives:​

  • Describe general underlying principles of recovery-oriented therapy for psychosis
  • Name and describe at a high level three specific psychosis-focused therapies
  • Explain three strategies for working with distressing voices

Instructor(s): 

Nev Jones PhD is an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh and a mental health services researcher with specific expertise in psychosis.  In addition to her academic work, Dr. Jones previously co-founded and co-directed Chicago Hearing Voices and the Bay Area Hearing Voices Network, and has many years of experience leading peer support groups, providing 1:1 support for youth and adults experiencing psychosis and consulting with community-based providers to improve psychosis-focused services.  She has published widely on engagement and outcomes in SMI, and developed and led trainings on service implementation and quality improvement across the US. 

Helen Wood (she/her/hers) is the clinical psychologist for the Comprehensive Recovery Services (CRS) outpatient services, including STEP (Services for the Treatment of Early Psychosis) at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital (WPH). She is leading the implementation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) for CRS. She was previously Program Director for the adult psychosis inpatient unit at UPMC WPH. Helen chairs the North American CBTp Network’s First Episode Psychosis working group and has co-authored publications on group teletherapy, Cognitive Remediation Therapy and peer support for people experiencing psychosis. Helen obtained her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in the UK (2011). Prior to moving to Pittsburgh, she worked for the UK National Health Service in outpatient mental health services in and around London.

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Young Survivors Grief a 3 Part Series 

Date(s): February 10, February 17 & February 24, 2023

Time(s): 1:00PM-4:00PM per session

CE Hours Per Session: 3.0

Total CE Hours: 9.0

Course Topic One (2/10/2023): Childhood Grief and Tragic Loss: Too Young to Say Goodbye
Childhood Grief: Too Young to Say Goodbye is Part I of the Young Survivors Traumatic Grief Series. In the wake of losing a beloved parent or family member, friend or classmate, or school administrator, teacher, or support staff, children may develop more questions than answers as they grow to understand the permanence of death. A traumatic loss arising from a suicide, homicide, or school violence can evoke a child’s trauma symptoms and feelings of fearfulness, panic, and terror. Throughout this training, participants will discover the power of collaborative support and best practices for talking to children about an unexpected loss. Additionally, participants will acquire best practices for recognizing and regulating trauma symptoms and triggers and incorporating resilience-building stress management techniques with a grieving child. Moreover, participants will develop strategies for actively listening and validating the child’s experience as well as offering reassurance, validation, and emotional support. Following, participants will develop an in-depth awareness of suicide prevention techniques: decreasing risk factors, increasing protective factors, promoting positive relationship-building with parents, families, and caregivers, enhancing life skills, and fostering healthy social and emotional school and home environments.

Learning Outcomes:

  • After this course, participants will be able to use evidence-based strategies for discussing childhood grief, traumatic grief, and trauma loss with grieving children.
  • After this course, participants will be able to recognize a child’s social and emotional regression, behavioral challenges, and maladaptive cognitions while grieving a loss.
  • After this course, participants will be able to identify best practices for recognizing and regulating trauma symptoms and triggers and incorporating resilience-building stress management techniques with a grieving child.
  • After this course, participants will be able to apply comprehensive suicide prevention and crisis intervention techniques to combat risk factors, warning signs and symptoms, and suicide plans and attempts.
Course Topic Two (2/17/2023): Adolescent Grief and Tragic Loss: Too Young to Say Goodbye
Adolescent Grief: Too Young to Say Goodbye is Part II of the Young Survivors Traumatic Grief Series. In the aftermath of a suicidal death, school or community shooting, or related tragic event, adolescents are likely to receive the news via a media outlet, social media, friend, or family member. They are seeking answers to better cope with emotional distress and the unforgettable loss of a neighbor, friend, school faculty or staff, or loved one. For adolescents, there may be greater implications for more detailed discussions about school and community safety and security, law enforcement and legislators enacting laws to protect school districts, and effectively regulating post-traumatic stress and developing a new normal after a crisis. Participants will gain effective strategies for responding to the following: How could I have prevented the traumatic event? Am I to blame for the tragedy? How is this tragic event going to impact my life? Participants will recognize signs of traumatic grief and assess for functional impairment, physical health, and suicidal ideations. Following, participants will increase their awareness of suicide prevention techniques by recognizing warning signs and reducing risk factors while learning the feelings, actions, changes, threats, and situations (FACTS). Additionally, participants will enhance their screening techniques for administering the Columbia Community Card for Teens and Columbia Community Card for Teachers.

Learning Outcomes

  • After this course, participants will be able to recognize an adolescent’s traumatic symptoms relating to hyperarousal, unhealthy cognitions, and recurring reminders or avoidance of unpleasant memories.
  • After this course, participants will be able to apply evidence-based strategies for discussing adolescent grief, adolescent traumatic grief, and tragic events.
  • After this course, participants will be able to identify best practices for helping adolescents cope with an unforgettable and traumatic loss, regain emotional regulation, and recover a sense of safety and security.
  • After this course, participants will be able to use the Columbia Card for Teens, Columbia Card for Teachers, and FACTS to effectively screen for risk factors, warning signs and symptoms, and suicide plans and attempts along with executing evidence-based techniques for suicide prevention and crisis intervention.
Course Topic Three (2/24/2023): Gun Violence and Tragic Loss: Grief Support for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults
Gun Violence and Tragic Loss: Grief Support for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults is Part III of the Young Survivors Traumatic Grief Series. Following the days of a traumatic event, our most vulnerable populations may struggle with reliving the trauma and recalling the painful cries for help, fears of an untimely rescue, and surviving the guilt of losing a beloved friend, peer, or school-based professional. Grief Support for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults expands upon part I and II of this three-part training series and deepens the practitioner’s real-world application for treating acute stress, grief, and trauma. While facing undesirable emotions and physiological symptoms, practitioners will introduce trauma narratives and exposure strategies to help young survivors alleviate cognitive distortions and emotional distress. Alongside trauma narratives and exposure strategies, participants will identify cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and evidence-based practices for modeling, role playing, and teaching young survivors stress relaxation management, grounding exercises, and mindfulness strategies.

Learning Outcomes

  • After this course, participants will be able to identify cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and evidence-based practices for modeling, role playing, and teaching young survivors stress relaxation management, grounding exercises, and mindfulness strategies.
  • After this course, participants will be able to apply trauma-informed cognitive behavioral therapy techniques for psychoeducation, trauma narration, and cognitive processing of the traumatic experiences.
  • After this course, participants will be able to define stuck points that impede the healing and recovery process and apply Socratic dialogue to challenge cognitive distortions

Instructor:


Tanika Johnson, Ed.D., M.A., LPC-MHSP, LMHC, NCC, BC-TMH, CCTP, Dr. Tanika Johnson is a Licensed Professional Counselor-Mental Health Service Provider, Licensed Mental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor, Board-Certified Telemental Health Provider, Certified Clinical Trauma Professional, Contributing Faculty Member, Continuing Education Presenter, and Education Consultant. She has a Doctor of Education and Education Specialist degree in Educational Leadership with a specialization in leadership, curriculum and instruction, and social and emotional development. Furthermore, she has a Master of Arts in Professional Counseling. Previously, she completed a special education teacher education program and was granted special education and psychology endorsements.

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Spring 2023 Course List

An Integrative Approach to the Assessment and Treatment of Mental Illness

Date: Monday March 20, 2023

Time: 9:00AM-12:00PM

CE Hours: 3.0

Location: Online Via Zoom

Course Description:

This training will introduce the underlying theories of the Integrative Approaches to treatment (e.g., Daoism, Buddhism, Systems theory), as well as familiarize practitioners with specific engagement strategies to facilitate change in clients' lives and assessment tools for understanding the root cause of mental illness and disease. Participants will leave with empirically-validated intervention tools for treating conditions such as depression, anxiety, grief/loss, and burnout/stress. Participants will also learn to exhibit cultural appreciation, rather than cultural appropriation, in the use of these tools and strategies.

Course Objectives:

  • To understand the major underlying theories of Integrative approaches to treatment.
  • To identify and describe at least three effective engagement and assessment strategies from an integrative perspective.
  • To understand and discuss three evidence-based, integrative intervention strategies for treating mental illness.
  • To discuss differences between cultural appreciation vs cultural appropriation.

Instructor:

Courtney Kubovcik, LSW is a licensed social worker and behavioral health therapist specializing in trauma-informed care. As a practitioner, Courtney uses embodiment techniques and integrative approaches to treatment. Courtney has been serving vulnerable populations for over a decade and understands the cycles of trauma and disease. Without exception, Courtney believes that all people are worthy of health and abundance, and that we all have the potential for healing within. Courtney believes that people are the experts in their own lives. As therapists and mental health professionals, our job is not to "fix" clients, but to help them build the skills that they need to "fix" themselves. Courtney helps clients find the right tools so they can thrive in their lives. She offers clients a unique, spiritual focus to build new coping skills.

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Mental Health & Race Meets Sports 

Date: Friday, April 21, 2023

Time: 9:00AM-12:00PM

CE Hours: 3.0

Location: Online Via Zoom

Course Description:

This training will discuss how athletes, as a group, are generally a more vulnerable and susceptible population who are more prone to mental health issues whether by injury or environmental factors and have more prevalent social work-related needs. Also, how athletes traditionally have not received proper social work or mental health treatment because they are deemed to be “healthy” individuals that are “free of mental health challenges and social problems.” Training will further discuss implicit bias, and the differences between equality and equity, what do equitable practices look like. Strategies to help improve game management and vulnerabilities that exist at the various levels of sports and further explore the vulnerabilities of athletes. 

Course Objectives:

 

  • By the end of the training, participants will explore the role of social work in sports   
  • By the end of the training, participants will understand the psychological needs in athletes   
  • By the end of the training, Participants to Identify that physical and mental health are interlinked   
  • By the end of the training, participants will understand the psychological impact that race has on people  
  • By the end of the training, participants will better understand the how to deal with the problems associated with race in sports 

Instructor(s):

Deshawn Hawkins, MSW, has dedicated himself to the nurturing and development of youth talent and character on the basketball court. A graduate of Capital Community College in 2002 where he scored over 1,200 points in two seasons, Deshawn was nominated as a Junior College All- American basketball player. He continued his career at Elms College where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Work, and played from 2002 to 2004 where he was named an All- Conference basketball player and participated in the 2004 New England Senior All- Star Game. Deshawn went on to earn his MSW from the University of Saint Joseph and has over 10 years of experience as a child protection social worker, the last three years as a supervisor, where he has been able to fulfill his passion of protecting and providing children with opportunities that they might not otherwise have due to life circumstances. Deshawn works to instill discipline, and sportsmanship while teaching resilience and teamwork in conjunction with teaching the basic fundamentals of basketball, as he believes in teaching life lessons through the game that he loves so much. 


 
Qur-an Webb, MSW has been in the social work field for over 20 years. Qur-an is Vice President of the Association of Black Sports Officials where he advocates for Black Officials and provides training and programming to related to athletics. Qur-an is also the Director of Operations at Welcome 2 Reality, LLC. In this role, he oversees all aspects of Welcome 2 Reality's daily operations including, but not limited to training, consultation, etc. Qur-an along with his partners at Welcome 2 Reality played an instrumental role in getting Substitute Senate Bill No. 962, Public Act No. 15-94 passed in Connecticut which in part mandates education on the safe use of social media and computer programming instruction in the public school system and the passing of Senate Bill No. 949, Public Act 17-67 which now an advisory council must be created related to digital citizenship, internet safety, and media literacy. Qur-an is the Connecticut Chapter Lead for Media Literacy Now which focuses on education around media literacy. He also works as an independent contractor and is an Assistance Professor at Western Connecticut State University.  Qur-an is a graduate of the Elm City Fellowship for Children and Families sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Lastly, Qur-an is a proud father and husband which two are his most important roles to date.  

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Racial Justice and Liberty Practice Series

Course 1: Social Identity, Positionality, Defining Racism

Please Note: the following course will be conducted asynchronously along with only three live ZOOM meetings throughout the duration of the course

Overall Course Duration: February 27 - March 17, 2023

Live Meeting Dates: March 2, March 9, & March 16

Meeting Times per Date: 12:00PM-1:00PM 

Total CE Hours: 12.0

  • Live CE Hours: 3.0
  • Asynchronous CE Hours: 9.0 hours total or 3.0 hours per week

Course Description:
In this course, we look at racism as a system and our positions within that system, with an emphasis on social, economic, and political power. We explore racial identity development and characteristics of dialogue about race and racism. We utilize book chapters, articles, videos, podcasts, websites, discussions, and more as ways of learning, with a focus on theory and action.

Course Objectives:
By participating in this course, participants will:

  • Identify their social identity and positionality and the implications on their practice.
  • Explore concepts, theories, and definitions about what race and racism are.
  • Better understand how racism operates systemically and the implications of this in the personal/professional settings they occupy.

Instructors:

Charla Cannon Yearwood, MSSW, LCSW, Charla Cannon Yearwood (she/ her) is the Founder and Clinical Director of Connected in Community, a therapy practice in Indianapolis. Charla is all about liberation, social justice, and community. She believes we are all connected in, by, and through community, meaning our healing is tied together. Her professional work is rooted in Black liberation and abolition. Charla’s research interests include liberation based clinical mental health care and other topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Outside of work, Charla and her husband have two children, two dogs, and a cat. As a family, they enjoy a good sing-a-long.

Shimon Cohen, MSW, LCSW Shimon Cohen (he/him) is a social work educator, podcaster, and change agent. He is passionate about racial justice and liberatory social work. Shimon is the host and producer of the nationally recognized podcast Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change. He enjoys family time with his wife, two daughters, and dog.

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Course 2: Racism Has Always Existed in the U.S.

Please Note: the following course will be conducted asynchronously along with only three live ZOOM meetings throughout the duration of the course

Overall Course Duration: April 17 - May 5, 2023

Live Meeting Dates: April 20, April 27, & May 4

Meeting Times per Date: 12:00PM-1:00PM 

Total CE Hours: 12.0

  • Live CE Hours: 3.0
  • Asynchronous CE Hours: 9.0 hours total or 3.0 hours per week

Course Description:
In this course, we look at the history of racism in the U.S., beginning with settler colonialism, genocide of Indigenous Peoples, and slavery of Africans, with an emphasis on how laws and policies have been used to institutionalize racism. We emphasize Indigenous and African resistance to white supremacy. We explore historical trauma and recognize it as an ongoing sociopolitical process. We utilize book chapters, articles, videos, podcasts, websites, discussions, and more as ways of learning, with a focus on theory and action.

Course Objectives:
By participating in this course, participants will:

  • Examine the historical origins of racism in the United States, beginning with European settler colonialism.
  • Identify how the law has been used to institutionalize racism, using the historical examples of slavery, citizenship, and whiteness, and the more present-day examples of housing discrimination.
  • Identify instances of African and Indigenous resistance to colonization, slavery, and domination, and the struggle for freedom.
  • Begin to conceptualize frameworks of historical trauma and recognize it as an ongoing sociopolitical process.
  • Identify the implications of racism and historical trauma in the U.S on their practice and in the personal/professional settings they occupy.

Instructors: 

Charla Cannon Yearwood, MSSW, LCSW, Charla Cannon Yearwood (she/ her) is the Founder and Clinical Director of Connected in Community, a therapy practice in Indianapolis. Charla is all about liberation, social justice, and community. She believes we are all connected in, by, and through community, meaning our healing is tied together. Her professional work is rooted in Black liberation and abolition. Charla’s research interests include liberation based clinical mental health care and other topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Outside of work, Charla and her husband have two children, two dogs, and a cat. As a family, they enjoy a good sing-a-long.

Shimon Cohen, MSW, LCSW Shimon Cohen (he/him) is a social work educator, podcaster, and change agent. He is passionate about racial justice and liberatory social work. Shimon is the host and producer of the nationally recognized podcast Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change. He enjoys family time with his wife, two daughters, and dog.

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Course 3: White Supremacy, White Privilege, Racism, & Oppression

Please Note: the following course will be conducted asynchronously along with only three live ZOOM meetings throughout the duration of the course

Overall Course Duration: May 8 - May 26, 2023

Live Meeting Dates: May 11, May 15 & May 25

Meeting Times per Date: 12:00PM-1:00PM 

Total CE Hours: 12.0

  • Live CE Hours: 3.0
  • Asynchronous CE Hours: 9.0 hours total or 3.0 hours per week

Course Description:
In this course, we look at the systems of whiteness, white supremacy, and white privilege/advantage, with an emphasis on why and how they were created and are maintained. We examine how white supremacy and racism show up within social work and are perpetuated by social work, both historically and present-day. We challenge the concept of cultural competence and look at ways to work for social change, not social control. We utilize book chapters, articles, videos, podcasts, websites, discussions, and more as ways of learning, with a focus on theory and action.

Course Objectives:
By participating in this course, participants will:

  • Explore concepts, theories, and definitions of whiteness, white supremacy and white privilege/advantage.
  • Identify the reasons why whiteness, white supremacy, and white privilege/advantage were created; how they were embedded in laws, policies, and dominant cultural views; and how they are maintained.
  • Examine racism and white supremacy within social work, both historically and present-day, including whitewashed history, family separation, internment, surveillance, social control, and discriminatory practices.

Instructors: 

Charla Cannon Yearwood, MSSW, LCSW, Charla Cannon Yearwood (she/ her) is the Founder and Clinical Director of Connected in Community, a therapy practice in Indianapolis. Charla is all about liberation, social justice, and community. She believes we are all connected in, by, and through community, meaning our healing is tied together. Her professional work is rooted in Black liberation and abolition. Charla’s research interests include liberation based clinical mental health care and other topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Outside of work, Charla and her husband have two children, two dogs, and a cat. As a family, they enjoy a good sing-a-long.

Shimon Cohen, MSW, LCSW Shimon Cohen (he/him) is a social work educator, podcaster, and change agent. He is passionate about racial justice and liberatory social work. Shimon is the host and producer of the nationally recognized podcast Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change. He enjoys family time with his wife, two daughters, and dog.

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CE On-Demand Courses

Continuing education can now be taken on your schedule! Topics include: Ethics, suicide prevention and intervention, anti-racist social work practice, LGBTQIA+ populations, and many more! All at the click of a mouse, at your own pace, and designed to fit your busy schedule! Check out our recorded self-paced CE programs now!