Shaun M. Eack Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Psychiatry, and Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute



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Contact

412-624-6300
2117 Cathedral of Learning

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Biography

Assistant Professor Shaun M. Eack earned his Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh.

Eack's primary interests include the development, implementation, and evaluation of psychosocial treatment methodologies to improve the care of people with schizophrenia and related disorders.  He is also interested in the biopsychosocial factors that contribute to recovery and psychosocial outcomes among people with schizophrenia and related disorders, and how the elucidation of these factors can serve to aid novel treatment development efforts.  In addition, Dr. Eack holds a broad interest in social work education and workforce development as they relate to the provision of care for persons with schizophrenia and other severe mental illnesses.

Current Grant Support

  • Principal Investigator. (2010-2012). Cognitive Rehabilitation Effects on Social-Cognitive Brain Function in Schizophrenia. The purpose of this grant is to examine the neurobiologic effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy, a novel social and non-social cognitive rehabilitation program, on social-cognitive brain mechanisms in individuals with schizophrenia.  In addition, this project seeks to validate and translate for use in clinical trials two novel functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms for assessing social-cognitive brain processes supporting perspective-taking and emotion regulation in schizophrenia. National Institutes of Health.
  • Site Principal Investigator. (2009-2014). (John Kane, PI). Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenic Episode. The purpose of this contract is to design, test, and implement a treatment package for individuals experiencing a first episode of schizophrenia that will alter the often devastating long-term course of this disorder. The treatment package will include both pharmacological and psychosocial therapies, and will be tested and implemented in community clinics across the United States. National Institute of Mental Health.
  • Co-Principal Investigator. (2009-2014). Adapting Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for ASD. The purpose of this grant is to adapt, pilot and preliminarily test of the effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) for young transitional-age high functioning adults with ASD to improve adaptive functioning and adult life achievement in this population. National Institute of Mental Health.
  • Co-Principal Investigator. (2010-2013). Evidence-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation to Improve Functional Outcomes for Young Adults with Autism-Spectrum Disorders. The purpose of this grant is to conduct a randomized-controlled trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in young adults with high function autism spectrum disorders to improve adaptive functioning and adult life achievement in this population. Autism Speaks.
  • Co-Principal Investigator. (2009-2014). Deciphering Altered Brain Connectivity in ASD to Improve Intervention. The purpose of this of this research is to translate recent scientific advances in ASD into a novel intervention, identify mechanisms underlying major behavioral issues in childhood and adulthood that will directly support improvements in everyday treatment, and expand knowledge about the fundamental causative mechanisms of autism that will lead to the next generation of discoveries. Pennsylvania Department of Health and Human Services.

Donations

Please consider making a donation to the ASCEND Program to support our research.  We currently receive donations for the two primary conditions we study – autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. 

Selected Publications

  • Eack, S. M., Hogarty, G. E., Cho, R. Y., Prasad, K. M. R., Greenwald, D. P., Hogarty, S. S., & Keshavan, M. S.  (in press).  Neuroprotective effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy against gray matter loss in early schizophrenia: Results from a two-year randomized controlled trial.  Archives of General Psychiatry.
  • Eack, S. M., Greenwald, D. P., Hogarty, S. S., Cooley, S. S., DiBarry, A. L., Montrose, D. M., & Keshavan, M. S.  (2009).  Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for early-course schizophrenia: Effects of a two-year randomized controlled trial.  Psychiatric Services, 60(11), 1468-1476.
  • Eack, S. M. & Newhill, C. E. (2008). An investigation of the relations between student knowledge, personal contact, and attitudes toward individuals with schizophrenia. Journal of Social Work Education, 44(3), 77-95.
  • Eack, S. M. & Newhill, C. E. (2007). Psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 33(5), 1225-1237.
  • Eack, S. M., Hogarty, G. E., Greenwald, D. P., Hogarty, S. S., & Keshavan, M. S. (2007). Cognitive Enhancement Therapy improves Emotional Intelligence in early course schizophrenia: Preliminary effects. Schizophrenia Research, 89(1-3), 308-311.