Liz Winter Clinical Assistant Professor Academic Coordinator, Child Welfare Education for Leadership Program (CWEL)



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412-648-2371
2327 Cathedral of Learning
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

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Biography

Liz Winter earned her PhD in social work and MSW from Pitt as well as an MA in jurisprudence from the University of Oxford.

Winter is the Academic Coordinator of the school’s Child Welfare Education for Leadership Program (CWEL) which provides graduate social work education for public child welfare workers in Pennsylvania. As a clinical assistant professor, Winter teaches theory and practice courses in the MSW program. She practiced law in England before coming to the United States and obtaining her education in social work after spending several years as a professional rowing coach. She has worked in child- and family-serving agency settings in Pittsburgh and has provided training and consultation to human services and healthcare providers.

Dr. Winter uses Team-Based Learning™, an evidence-based collaborative learning and teaching strategy, in all her classes. She is also a certified Team-Based Learning™ Consultant and Mentor.

Her professional interests include child welfare workforce development and retention, LGBTQ youth in child and family serving systems, co-occurring disorders, and traumatic stress. Winter maintains a private practice, working with a variety of behavioral health concerns.

Selected Publications

Winter, E. (2012). The role of alcohol and drugs in child sexual abuse. In J.L. Postmus (Ed.), Sexual violence and abuse: An encyclopedia of prevention, impacts, and recovery. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Winter, E. A. (2005). Evaluating and improving clinical practice. In Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Friedland, J. A., Judy, K. R., Shetty, I., and Westman, H. (Eds.). Londonderry, NH: MEBN.

Cyranowski, J. M., Frank, E., Winter, E., Rucci, P., Novick, D., Pilkonis, P., et al. (2004). Personality pathology and outcome in recurrently depressed women over two years of Maintenance Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Psychological Medicine, 34, p. 659-669.